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Retirement is the new Ultimate Vacation: The AARP’s Decide. Create. Share. 40 Day Pledge

I am thrilled to announce the AARP’s Decide. Create. Share. 40 Day Pledge is teaming up with GYST to make it ‘fill-in-the-blanks’ easy for you to get your retirement and long-term care shit together. In fact, taking care of this sooner can make you happier.

In fact, 4 years ago, the AARP helped me. When I was searching online for a list of ‘what to do’ or some sort of guide after my husband was killed, I really couldn’t find much. There were bits and pieces of information in random spots, but it was all over the place and not really specific to me. I was handed an AARP brochure by my Uncle Curt, and while the focus was losing a spouse when already retired, it was one of the few helpful pieces of information I found. In fact, I never would have known to contact social security.

Turns out, I needed to be thinking beyond our 401ks and holistically planning retirement before I was already retired.

So, here’s our to-do item: Decide what you want – Create a plan – Share it with others.

Here comes the ‘forehead slap’ part:
1) I am not telling you anything you don’t already know.
2) You’re likely one of the 80% of Americans between 30-54 who believe they will not have enough money put away for retirement.
3) Or, maybe, one of the 36% of American’s who don’t have anything saved.

I get how ‘Planning for Retirement’ sounds like what our parents did, kind of boring and easy to put off till next week…I know I can make excuses that I need to organize my sock drawer first or schedule that dentist appointment instead. The future seems so far away. Finances are confusing and stressful for many of us. Many people have written me to say they are afraid to fill in the numbers in the planning calculator because they’ll find out just how screwed they are. I hear you.

Honestly, I still have some work to finish here. The energy it takes me to keep procrastinating is weighing on me.

So, lets take a deep breath and make this easier on ourselves.

Almost all of us love planning vacations! So for these next 40 Days, we are going to Pledge to Decide, Create and Share the most awesome, longest vacation plan EVER.

Your Retirement: The Dream Vacation of a Lifetime!

It already sounds like much more fun, and in fact, it could make us all happier. According to a Dutch study, people who went on vacation were actually happier before the trip than after because the excitement of anticipation (Nawjin, Marchand, Veenhoven & Vingerhoets, 2010).

So, anticipate this: living a long, lovely, and well cared for 18 years (the average length of retirement) as an ultimate Life Success Story. I want one. And so do you. So we are All-Together-Now doing this 40-Day Pledge, let’s get the odds in our favor.

  1. Elizabeth says:

    I have already started by puting my house on the market. But will still take the forty day challenge. Wish me luck with both.

  2. Pingback: Retirement is the new Ultimate Vacation: The AARP’s Decide. Create. Share. 40 Day Pledge | Get Your Shit Together | All Things Palliative - Article Feed

  3. Cheryl says:

    No way I have come very far in un-procrastination — some of us have been practicing that for most of our lives! But just an add-on to the ideas about planning for retirement financially – for the ultimate vacation. Since I am 67 and retired for a few years already —
    if you can – really think about how you want to live. It can be difficult. I find myself looking at my house that I am pretty much responsible for – and unable to keep up with — and thinking about how I want to be somewhere where I won’t have to drive everywhere —

    A lot of us women are going to be on our own and have to look at the future that way: what can we do so that we can spend out time doing things that are interesting — rather than drudgery?

    I so envy those who have a real obsession with a particular “hobby” – a consuming interest – because it now can be a blessing.

    For those of us who may have a lot of interests, but no all consuming ones — start early to follow up with courses, volunteer work…. it was easy to let go of the stressful parts of work, but — after the initial freedom — I and most friends needed to get involved.

    Personally, while I’m involved in one retirement group, I like to take courses at a local community colleges with the kids ( practically free for aging auditors) and volunteer where I can be of some use while meeting people from very different backgrounds and ages.

    Why should someone younger, maybe in the middle of caring for children, working , etc – think about this stuff? Because the earlier you build new interests — and learn to be flexible — the easier the transition will be.

    I am terrible at keeping house; but not so bad a keeping “mind.”